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Hunting on Ahtna Land

Please remember that Ahtna lands are private lands. In general, hunting is not allowed on Ahtna lands for the general public, but you can buy a permit to cross Ahtna lands to reach other hunting grounds on public lands. We ask that you respect this land as it is our home. To access our lands, a Land Use Permit is required at all times: ahtna.com/permits. A hunter has the personal responsibility to make sure he or she can legally hunt in their chosen area.

While we don’t allow general hunting on Ahtna land, we do offer predator-control permits for hunting bear, wolf and coyotes. Also, using one of Ahtna’s allowed hunting guides allows you to hunt sheep and moose. 

Contact Ahtna Land Department:

Phone: (907) 822-3476
Email: ahtnalands@ahtna.net
P.O. Box 649
Glennallen, AK 99588

Ahtna's Regional Map App loaded on a phone held by a gloved hand in front of an Alaskan river.

Need help identifying Ahtna Lands?
An interactive online land status map of the Ahtna Region can be viewed at: www.ahtna.com/lands/maps/ or you can download our free app on your mobile device by searching for “Ahtna” in the Apple App Store or Google Play Store. Land ownership maps are also available from the State of Alaska, Bureau of Land Management, or even on popular hunting apps. A hunter has the personal responsibility to make sure he or she can legally hunt in their chosen area.

Hunting FAQ

Can I hunt on Ahtna lands?

In general, hunting is not allowed on Ahtna lands for the general public, but you can buy a permit to cross Ahtna lands to reach other hunting grounds on public lands. To access our lands, a Land Use Permit is required at all times: ahtna.com/permits. A hunter has the personal responsibility to make sure he or she can legally hunt in their chosen area.

While we don’t allow general hunting on Ahtna land, we do offer predator-control permits for hunting bear, wolf and coyotes. Also, using one of Ahtna’s allowed hunting guides allows you to hunt sheep and moose. 

Why do I need a permit to use Ahtna lands?

Ahtna lands are privately-owned and therefor requires a Land Use Permit, which are issued on an annual (Jan-Dec), weekly and daily basis. Use of Ahtna lands without a permit is considered trespass under Alaska State law. The purchase of an Ahtna land permit helps support important programs to help maintain the lands for enjoyment by current and future generations such as: moose management to help increase populations and habitat, campgrounds and cabins for public use, public education and outreach on customary and traditional use practices, land patrols to ensure public safety, litter clean up, compliance with land use policies and fish and game harvest regulations.

Can I hunt bison on Ahtna land?

Until further notice, Ahtna, Incorporated will no longer issue land access permits for hunting bison associated with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) Permit No’s. DI 450 & DI 454, as well as predator control permits within these respective bison hunt areas.

Can I hunt wolves, coyotes, brown and black bears on Ahtna lands?

Ahtna sells a permit that allows for the hunting of wolves, coyotes, brown and black bears on Ahtna lands. Predator hunting is not allowed during moose season. There is no cost for state-certified aerial predator control. To purchase the predator control permit, please visit: ahtna.com/permits.

Please remember that Ahtna lands are private lands and are subject to the jurisdiction of the State of Alaska; therefore, all hunting activity must be conducted in accordance with State wildlife, hunting and fishing regulations. 

Ahtna also reserves the right to end all permitting of predator control/hunting within Ahtna lands at any time, should large prey/predator ratios reach sustainable numbers. This determination will be made prior to issuing annual predator control/hunting permits.

Which hunting guides does Ahtna allow to hunt on their lands?

For the latest list of approved hunting guides, please contact the Ahtna Land Department at (907) 822-3476 or landdepartment@ahtna.net.

Please remember that Ahtna lands are private lands and are subject to the jurisdiction of the State of Alaska; therefore, all hunting activity must be conducted in accordance with State wildlife, hunting and fishing regulations. 

What happens if I trespass on Ahtna lands?

Ahtna lands are considered private property under Alaska statute. Any non-authorized use on Ahtna lands will be considered trespass and prosecuted to the full extent of the law.

Can I fish on Ahtna lands?

Fishing is the number-one recreational use of Ahtna lands. People travel to the Ahtna Region from all over Alaska, other states and around the world for our renowned Copper River red salmon. The Klutina and Gulkana Rivers also support a king salmon fishery.

The most popular fishery in the Ahtna Region is the Chitina dipnet fishery, with over 10,000 personal-subsistence dipnet permits issued annually for this area alone. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game has a helpful video on its website on how to dipnet at Chitina.

*Please note that Chitina Village lands are owned by Chitina Native Corporation, which is separate from Ahtna and will require a permit for use of its lands. Popular dipnetting areas on Chitina Village lands are at O’Brien Creek and Salmon Point. Both areas have pay stations for day use and camping permits. Ahtna pay stations are located at Haley and Eskilida Creeks south of O’Brien Creek, and at the Kotsina River on the southwest corner of the Copper River Bridge.

Fishing for grayling and Dolly Varden char is available in the Copper River Basin. Fly fishing for grayling and Dolly Varden char is popular in the Cantwell area.